Young Thistle

 
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Member: donwrob
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About This Image

While waiting for a sunset to light up I took this shot of a young thistle against the late sky. The sunset never did ignite as I hoped it would, but I thought this was a pretty image. Thanks for looking, Don

I have a few days off and may be able to somewhat catch-up on comments! :-)

Comments

Roger won't be able

Angelina - Oct 13, 2015 04:30 PM EDT
Roger won't be able to make it this week, so I didn't include the stnadard a VGHVI link; but if you want to join us on XBL and aren't already on my friends list, feel free to send me a friends request at .(Just make sure to either mention your gamertag in the comment thread here or mention VGHVI in the invite or something so I know who you are.)
Alfresco - Jul 23, 2008 12:20 AM EDT
Nice image, Don, thinking outside the box to combine those elements, great result! I think teasels were native to Europe, and were imported to North America with the early settlers, who grew them to use the dried heads to comb or "tease" wool. Some escaped into the wild, and here we are with billions of them.
alandrapal - Jun 20, 2008 03:22 AM EDT
back for another viewing, such a striking image, Don. love it.
Guest - Sep 20, 2007 08:47 PM EDT
Thanks Alex, Alandra, Ikka and Anne! Thanks for taking the time to write the nice comments and Alandra for the info on the Teasels.
Guest - Sep 18, 2007 06:19 PM EDT
What a great photo. Love it.
Guest - Sep 17, 2007 08:47 AM EDT
Outstanding capture! Congratulations.
Guest - Jul 19, 2007 11:39 PM EDT
Great overall effect, Don. Nicely composed. Vicki
Guest - Jul 19, 2007 03:07 PM EDT
Hi Don, finally getting back to you re the teasels. Yes, the ones I'm familiar with are dried out brown colour, have never seen green ones :) Believe the dried brown teasels were used to "tease"/brush the woollen yarn and cloth years ago in manufacture of clothing, will have to check on google. They are sometimes seen in dried flower arrangements also.
Guest - Jun 22, 2007 06:00 AM EDT
Very nicely done. I took some similar shots recently which I will be posting. I like the colors and composition very much.
Guest - Jun 20, 2007 08:54 AM EDT
Thanks everyone for the very nice comments! A Teasel? I've never heard them called that Alandra. I've lead a sheltered life :-). These are green and small and just newly growing. Later they will flower with a pretty purple color I believe. In the fall they will dry out and become what I always called Thistles. Are the dryed out brown Thistles what you call Teasels? Interesting stuff to me, it's fun to be oldish and still have so much to learn. Thanks again all, Don
Guest - Jun 20, 2007 05:44 AM EDT
Amazing how such an ugly plant can make such a beautiful shot. The evening sun makes for such amazing colour. BTW love the framing too
Guest - Jun 20, 2007 12:38 AM EDT
What a great photo you managed with this one Don.
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 11:38 PM EDT
This surely is a great photo Don, well done.
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 11:33 PM EDT
WOW I hope this is on the wall. I love the simplisity and the mood of this photo
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 11:07 PM EDT
Lovely image - nice silhouette. And I agree with Alandra on it being a teasel.
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 10:22 PM EDT
Very nice.
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 10:05 PM EDT
very pleasing image. but I think this might be a "spent thistle" Don, or teasel in other words :) - at least that's what we call them.
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 05:01 PM EDT
Lovely work.
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 04:49 PM EDT
Love this one, the rich colours, Ex capture.
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 01:03 PM EDT
Don, I loved this one. For some reason, it reminded me of a cactus out on the desert. Beautiful colors and I love colors. *g* Great Picture.
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 12:11 PM EDT
WOW!! I'd say it was lit up quite well,great shot.
Guest - Jun 19, 2007 11:10 AM EDT
I love the hues of color and the clarity of the thistle.

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